What is new in the latest Canon cameras?

As you might have come across about the announcement of two new cameras from Canon, this post is about my take on those cameras.

One being named as Canon EOS 5DS and the other being EOS 5DS R – the one big difference between these two cameras is the 5DS R comes with “Low-pass filter effect cancellation” which must be a good news for Professional Landscape photographers. However, I am writing a separate article about the low-pass filter aka Anti-alias filter.

Both the two cameras are full frame sensors and having high resolution of 50.6 megapixels. First time in the line of Canon EOS cameras, to have this high resolution.

  • The specification of both the cameras states about the Low-pass filter that “Fixed position in front of the image sensor” and in the feature page of 5DS R clearly states that LPF (Low-pass filter) effect cancellation takes full advantage of the original resolving power of the 50.6 effective megapixels CMOS sensor, delivering even higher resolution images” Which makes me wonder Canon might have taken the Nikon’s way as Nikon did it in it’s D800 E. If canon have taken a different method to cancel the filter’s effect, we don’t know, will have to wait for the detailed lab review from the reviewers.
  • The prices for 5DS mentioned as $3699.00 and for 5DS R as $3899.00 for a 50.6 megapixels camera, I would say decently priced.
  • Maximum ISO on both the cameras are 6400 only. Whereas in 5D MKIII one can peak up to ISO 25600. If not all, few will definitely going to turned off by this. The reason behind this is because of bringing in more pixels in the same sensor area. (The pixel unit for 5D MKIII is 6.25μm square and the pixel unit for 5DS is 4.14μm square. The more this no. better spacing,better signal to noise ratio, better image quality, going in depth about this becomes a science class, where I am not that good, I will leave it here itself).
  • Shutter speed remain same as in 5D MKIII, max speed is 1/8000. Possibilities are there for the same shutter as in 5D MKIII.
  • Built in Intervalometer comes in both the models, which will be lauded by the enthusiasts.
  • The 1.3X and 1.6X are the options in processing (in-camera processing). Post capture, the image will be cropped and pushed to the memory cards as the user desires.
  • Advanced mirror control mechanism is definitely going to help minimise shakes in low shutter speed.
  • The Dual DIGIC 6 processors are definitely expected to handle the massive 5 fps data from the sensor.
  • USB 3.0 is as well going to support transferring the images.
  • EOS Scene Detection System features a 150,000-pixel RGB+IR Metering Sensor for excellent precision, this is going to help in nailing perfect exposure.

In a nutshell, ISO performance is going to turn off the professionals, especially event photographers. Many would have expected Wi-fi and in-built GPS, which is not been provided in one model even.

Except the above, I think the other specifications calls for a go around though. I would like to take out this machine for a while.

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What is Focal length, Sensor size in photography and why is it matters?

The intention of this article is to dig out the relationships between focal length of the lens and the camera’s sensor sizes and how does the both affects the framing independently.

I have made a simple illustration diagram below, which depicts how does the light enters from the scene to the sensor/film.

Focal Length-Photography-Sensor-Light entryImage a. – Light travelling path inside a lens and camera body from the scene. x is the height of the sensor(part of the camera), b is the focal plane(principal)- this always happens inside the lens, z is height of the frame (photograph’s vertical measurement in landscape mode), y is the focal length which is usually mentioned on the lens.

Focal length(y) is the distance between the sensor (a) and the focal plane (b) where the light rays converge to form a sharp image of an object to the digital sensor.

Now, the frame you see via the viewfinder will change, if you adjust the Focal length which is possible in zoom lenses. The same is not possible in prime lenses since the focal length has been set in the factory itself while manufacturing, in such a way that it cannot be changed. The prime lenses are made purposely for high quality at a lesser price comparatively with a zoom lens in that focal length.

Conversely, it is also possible to change the frame by changing the size of the sensor. But the sensor has been fit inside the camera while manufacturing in the factory itself and it cannot be changed by wish on the field. But you can use two different cameras having different sensor sizes as one may wish.

Now we have understood that, if we change the size of the sensor (x) or the focal length (y), in both the ways the frame will get changed.

The ranges of available lenses in the market with different focal lengths are beyond listing thus I am not getting into that.

Sensor sizesImage b – Scale of the other smaller sensors with respect to the Full frame sensor. The FF sensor size is 36mm × 24 mm. For the sake of understanding, we here discuss about the vertical  measurement(x).

The smaller the sensor sizes, the field of view gets narrower. That is, if “x” gets smaller, “z” also becomes smaller Assuming that the “y” is same in both the cases. Conversely, if “x” gets bigger the field of view (z) also gets wider.

The advantages and disadvantages of choosing which sensors (cameras) have been briefly explained here in my earlier article.

The crop ratio has been established in the industry with reference to the 35mm film sensors. 35mm width sensors are the reference one and the crop factor for those sensors is 1.00. Other sensors are classified by the crop factor with respect to 35mm sensors (1.00).

Crop factor is the ratio of the dimensions of a given sensor’s imaging area compared to the 35mm sensor’s imaging area (full frame sensors in common). If a sensor’s crop factor is more than 1(APS-C sensors), the image area will be less by that ratio. Conversely, if the crop factor of the camera is less than 1(medium format cameras), the image area will be more by that ratio.

For instance, if a camera’s crop ratio is 1.60 and you have mounted 85mm prime lens, what the camera sees is the view of 136mm (85mm × 1.60) not what is written on the lens. If the same 85mm lens been mounted on a medium format camera with 0.50 crop factor, what you will be seeing is 42.5 mm (85mm × 0.50) focal length view.

Sensor sizesImage c – Dimensions of the different sensors fixed in different cameras and the respective crop ratios.

The focal length written on the lens is true, only if it is mounted on 1.00 X crop factor sensors (full frame cameras). If you are mounting it on non-full frame cameras, you should multiply the crop factor of that camera to get the actual focal length.

I hope, I have covered all the necessary topics which are required to understand the focal length, sensor sizes and how does both affects what you see in the viewfinder. Have I missed something? or the article been helpful to you, do drop a comment and let me know.

Cheers & Happy Photographing.